Every Woman Needs To Read This Warning About a Possible Kidnapping Lure

Getty Images News / Tim Boyle

Women, especially young women, need to be aware of their surroundings when they approach their vehicle. There are a variety of scams that seek to distract a young woman, only to have her nabbed by potential kidnappers.

A teenager named Ashley Hadacre recently suffered a scare when she was leaving work and is warning social media users about it.

Ashley works outside of Flint, Michigan, and was leaving work with a friend when she noticed something on her car. She got in her car and realized someone had placed a shirt on the hood of her car. She ran her windshield wipers but realized that the shirt was actually tied to one of them.

As she looked around, she noticed the parking lot was empty except for one idling vehicle. Finding this extremely odd, she drove to safety before getting out of her car to remove the shirt.

Fortunately, Ashley's parents had warned her about similar scams that target teenage girls. Sometimes people will leave what looks like money under the windshield, only to rush up on the girl when she's distracted.

Sometimes these scams don't involve kidnapping but instead involve stealing the vehicle. Since a person often leaves their keys in the ignition while getting out to investigate, the robber can hop in and just drive off. Either way, it's not someone anyone should experience.

Getty Images News / Tim Boyle

Ashley was shaken by the event and posted it on social media. She wanted to be sure others were aware of similar scams taking place across Michigan.

Thousands of people shared her post, terrified at the prospect of falling victim to this scam.

If you approach your vehicle and notice something strange under the windshield wiper, immediately pay attention to your surroundings. If you are already in your vehicle, drive to a safe location before getting out to investigate.

If you or someone you know could fall victim to such a scam, be sure they are aware of the tips. It can keep them and their car safe from scumbags.

Getty Images News / Chris Hondros